Analyzing Twitter Usage

I came across an interesting tool the other day – Twitter Stats – provided by Brad Kellett.

The tool is a web-based adaptation of code by Damon Cortesi, who produced a tool to grab stats from a user’s Twitter feed and aggregate them to show overall stats.

The tool looks at:

  • Tweets per hour of the day
  • Total Tweets per day
  • Total Tweets per month
  • Top @replies
  • Top overall @s

Here’s a quick analysis of the stats from my Twitter account.

Total Tweets Per Month

If you’ve read any of my recent posts on my social media tool usage, this won’t surprise you.

As with many tools, my usage of Twitter has rocketed since I started using it in September. There are two good reasons for this:

  1. As I follow more people (I follow roughly 300 right now), I find more interesting conversations that I want to participate in
  2. As more people follow me, Twitter becomes a more powerful tool for soliciting feedback and opinions

Of course, December covered the Christmas period when I wasn’t at work and was generally freer to engage with people.

twitterstats1

Total Tweets Per Day

I’m not sure what to make of this one. My usage drops off on Friday, perhaps because I’m less available in the evenings on Fridays.

I don’t, however, have an explanation for why Tuesdays and Wednesdays are my busiest days. Anyone have any ideas?

twitterstats2

Tweets Per Hour Of The Day

This makes sense. I’m most available at two times of day:

  1. When I first get to work, drink my coffee and catch up on what’s going on
  2. During my lunch hour

There’s a drop between 6 and 7, when I’m usually out running, but I’m usually online around 8-9pm, when I tend to write my blog posts.

I’m a little surprised that I apparently do some tweeting between 4 and 6am. Bizarre.

twitterstats3

Top @ Replies

These are apparently the top ten people I send messages to:

  1. Ed Lee (edlee)
  2. Chris Brogan (chrisbrogan)
  3. David Jones (doctor_jones)
  4. Todd Defren (tdefren)
  5. Michael Allison (michaelallison)
  6. Mitch Joel (mitchjoel)
  7. Neville Hobson (jangles)
  8. Joseph Thornley (thornley)
  9. Bryan Persons (bryper)
  10. CC Chapman (cc_chapman)

Makes sense to me – all ten of these guys (yep, all guys) are smart and interesting. Seven of them produce podcasts that I subscribe to (if you include Todd on the New Media Release Cast).

If you’re on Twitter, into social media and you’re not following these guys, you’re missing out.

twitterstats4

Top Overall @s

I’m not sure what this one is all about. Perhaps the people I message out of the blue, as opposed to reply to? Enlighten me.

A few extra names here – more people that I suggest you follow if you’re into this space:

  1. Shel Holtz (shel)
  2. Joseph Jaffe (jaffejuice)
  3. Chris Clarke (clarkey) – blogs at StudentPR.com, which appears to be down at the moment
  4. Brian Solis (briansolis)
  5. Tod Maffin (todmaffin)

twitterstats5

What do your stats look like? Do they resemble mine? What patterns do you see?

  • Colin Fast

    I was a curious about the “overall @’s” as well. I believe it only counts as a direct reply when the message starts with “@”, so I think the “overall @’s” are people that are most mentioned in the body of your messages (without it being a direct reply), if that makes sense.

    For example:
    1. @davefleet how’s it going? (direct reply)
    2. Leaving a comment on @davefleet ‘s blog (just an @)
    .

  • Ditto on the puzzlement over “Top Overall @’s”

    Dave, you’re on both my Top @replies and “Top Overall @’s.”

  • Yes, top overall @s is the number of times you @ someone in a tweet, instead of directly replying to them. I’ll try and make it a little clearer in the new version (due very soon).

  • That all makes sense to me. Thanks guys!

    Brad – sounds great. Thanks for providing a very useful tool.

    Still curious – do other people have similar usage patterns to me? How do you use Twitter?

  • Very interesting, I’ll have to make sure that I am following all the top names that you are! I’ll also have to check out my own usage patterns. Thanks for posting this!

  • Just thought I’d let you know that I did indeed launch the new version last night, and the stats pages have more of an explanation of what they mean.