Different Types of Engagement

I’ve noticed what I think is a trend in the ways people engage with me on this site:

  • If I write a short, focused post, or one with a clear call to action, it gets comments.
  • If I write a controversial post, it gets trackbacks.
  • If I write a long list or thorough analysis piece, it gets bookmarked or stumbled.
  • Very few of my posts get dugg.

My guess:

  • Short posts are easy to get through in a minute or two, so commenting is relatively low-effort. Posts with a call to action, well, call you to action. Same result.
  • Controversial posts provoke thought, after which people write their own posts.
  • Long lists and analyses aren’t as easy to digest, so people save them and return to them later.

The question is, what makes a post digg-able?

Thoughts?

  • Could it be the majority of your audience is not the “digging” kind Dave? There are a lot of active blog readers, stumblers, commenters out there who have never used Dig before.

    Interesting to think about… I wonder what the answer is.

  • Yeah, I’ll have to side with Ben. I actively participate in the space and don’t use Dig at all. I actually find the opposite with short versus long posts on my blog, though my long posts are often controversial AND have a call to action.

  • I’ll have to echo everybody else-I usually use Del.ici.ous rather than Digg. Maybe we’re just not a Digg-ing bunch?…

  • Perhaps the better question, Dave, is why you want your posts to be dugg.

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  • My experience is that the Digg community skews largely on matters of technology. Perhaps a variant of Digg would be beneficial for Marketing and PR. But, back to Ari’s question, why would you want your posts to be dugg?

  • Hey Mark, Ari…

    I don’t particularly ‘care’ if my posts get dugg. I’m flattered if anyone sees fit to save/vote for them on any service, but I have no particular craving for it. Subscriber trends are a better indicator for me of whether my posts are resonating over time.

    However, I am curious as to why some posts (not on this site, clearly) get dugg while others get stumbled/saved on Delicious/spunn etc. It’s a curiosity thing.